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07 June 2021

Linkin Park’s ‘In The End’ Reaches One Billion Streams On Spotify

Linkin Park 2001
Pictorial Press Ltd/Alamy Stock Photo
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Linkin Park‘s In The End has become the first nu-metal song to reach one billion streams on Spotify, according to ChartData.

On its initial release, In The End reached the Top 10 of charts worldwide and reached No 2 on the US Billboard Hot 100, helping the band’s debut album, 2000’s Hybrid Theory, on the way to selling over 20 million copies. The band’s Mike Shinoda spoke to Rock Sound earlier this year about the song and why it continues to resonate today: “There’s a weird battle with hopelessness and the ephemeral nature of time and our lives that the song is really about. What’s so odd about the song is its almost talking about these things and saying ‘I don’t have any answers.’ Because usually a song isn’t about having no answers right? It just kind of runs itself around in a circle lyrically. And especially as a young person that’s just how I felt, that’s how we all felt, we just didn’t know what to make of things. In a sense that’s still what goes on today, it’s a timeless and universal thing.”

The news follows another landmark for the song – its iconic music video passed one billion views on YouTube last summer, the second of the band’s videos to do so after Numb.

The song’s hit potential became apparent during their live gigs, guitarist Brad Delson told Kerrang! earlier this year: “When we’d play In The End live, when we got to the bridge, it was always so loud that you couldn’t hear the band play. Naturally, at some point, we just stopped playing at that moment. Chester and Mike would just hold out the microphones and turn the lights on.”

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